NEWS

The latest from Rodney McLeod on and Off the Field

Sign-Up for my free Youth Football Camp

Come join me Super Bowl Champion Rodney McLeod for my annual Youth Football Camp for ages 8-14.

Saturday, June 23rd
Check-In Begins at 8:30am
Camp From 9am – 1pm

DeMatha Catholic High School
4313 Madison St, Hyattsville, MD 20781

The Camp is FREE but space is limited.

Click HERE to register.

img_1373

Rodney talks with Dave Dameshek

Rodney McLeod discusses the SuperBowl victory with Dave Dameshak. Check out the full video interview w Dave Dameshak.

Rodney joins NFL Blitz

Fresh off a huge Super Bowl victory Eagles Safety Rodney McLeod joins the Blitz and shares some of his favorite things. Watch the NFL BLitz Interviewhere.

RM23 on NFL Total Access

Rodney explains the selfless relationship between Carson Wentz and Nick Foles on NFL Total Access

Rodney McLeod hosts Halloween Pingpong-A-Palooza for cancer research

Philadelphia Eagles safety Rodney McLeod hosted a Halloween Pingpong-A-Palooza at SPiN Philadelphia on Monday to benefit the American Association for Cancer Research.

Courtesy of Eric Moody Tribune Correspondent | Oct

Partygoers came out dressed up in their Halloween costumes and indulged in gourmet food and pingpong games to support McLeod in his mission to raise money for cancer research. He was joined by fellow Eagles teammates including defensive backs Jalen Mills and Malcolm Jenkins.

The event began with food and beverages and nonstop pingpong action going on at each pingpong table. The event ended with a silent auction of signed Eagles merchandise being sold and and award for best-dressed Halloween costume.

“When I came to Philadelphia and saw everything that the AACR is doing for us, it was a no-brainer for me to be about it,” said McLeod, who lost his grandmother to pancreatic cancer his senior year of high school.

Mills opened up about having younger siblings and how he’d feel if they were battling cancer.

“These kids are showing how strong they are in fighting what they’re fighting and that was my whole point in coming out to this event to show support to them and my support to Rodney,” Mills said.

Jenkins, who’s been affected personally by cancer in his family, showed his respects for his teammate and his cause.

“My mom being a breast cancer survivor and also losing my grandma to cancer, this was an opportunity to support Rodney. Raise some money for a good cause and have a good time.”

To find out more about McLeod’s efforts in raising money for cancer research visit www.RodneyMcLeod23.com.

The event was also covered by:
Fox 29, Good Day Philadelphia, NBC10 and 6ABC in Philadelphia

Strength To Be

Lulu Lemon and Rodney McLeod have teamed up to present

Strength To Be

img_5872

Alliance Formed to Increase Mentorship

According to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics’ Division of Labor Force Statistics, the volunteer rate declined for the year ending in September 2015. Approximately 62.6 million people volunteered through or for an organization at least once between September 2014 and September 2015.

To increase the volunteer rates throughout the United States’ fifth largest city, NFL safety Rodney McLeod, Big Brothers Big Sisters Independence Region (BBBS Independence) and Pennsylvania State Senator Anthony Williams formed an alliance to register mentors while celebrating National Volunteer Month.

58f85d2a1400002b001b53ba

“I wouldn’t be where I am today without mentors and positive role models in my life,” stated McLeod of the Philadelphia Eagles. “There are thousands of youth in Philadelphia and South Jersey facing significant challenges in today’s society.”

Through McLeod’s “Mentoring Is Brotherhood Challenge,” the collective have set out to recruit 100 male volunteers and raise $5,000 to support youth mentoring programs, run by BBBS Independence, this month. BBBS Independence currently has more than 1,200 children signed up and waiting for mentors, with the majority being young African American and Hispanic. McLeod is working with BBBS Independence and State Senator Williams by challenging all men in the Delaware Valley, especially men of color, to step up and volunteer.

“I think there’s a misperception that mentoring is a time consuming process,” said Marcus Allen, CEO of BBBS Independence.

“Our only requirement is that volunteer mentors (Bigs) meet with their mentees (Littles) 2-4 hours, 2-4 times per month. The time requirement is minimal, but the results are life-changing for youth in the program. We’re excited Rodney has decided to support our mission and hopeful that his status as an elite football player will attract the male demographic we’re looking for right now.”

Read the full article at huffpost.com
Thank you to Louis Bolling for the article.

Rodney McLeod and state Sen. Anthony Williams join forces w/ Big Brothers Big Sisters to recruit men

State Sen. Anthony Williams, D-8, and Eagles Safety Rodney McLeod are challenging men to volunteer and become Big Brothers. Both came to Darby Township Fire Station to recruit men during National Volunteer Month.

Big Brother Big Sisters of America has more than 1,200 children on a waiting list for mentors. Eight hundred of them are boys according to Greg Burton, Vice President, Marketing and Communications at Big Brothers Big Sisters Independence Region. The Big Brothers Big Sisters program touches lives in Chester, Delaware, Montgomery and Philadelphia counties. The program also serves youngsters in Gloucester, Camden and Burlington in New Jersey.

Williams and McLeod talked to the small crowd gathered at the fire house about the impact one can make on a youngster as a mentor. Williams stressed the need for men to step up within the community to help children.

“We are recruiting men for young men. You may be at home, or at the mall or doing whatever you are doing, but at some course during your day, your week, your month or your year, you are going to come in contact with a young man who needs help. This is your opportunity to do something before he needs the help. Come out and sign up to be a Big Brother. It doesn’t take a lot of money and frankly it doesn’t take much time. What it does take is commitment of your heart and consideration for another generation,” said Williams.

Luckily McLeod had both parents rooting for him and supporting him.

“I always looked up to my parents. My mom and dad were always part of my life. They supported me to become the guy I am today; I feel it’s my duty to help other youth in the community. It’s much needed,” said McLeod.

Two Big Brothers from Delaware County were on hand to answer questions and encourage other men to become involved in the Big Brothers Big Sisters program.

Tom McElvogue of Wayne mentored six young men. One graduated from Villanova University and another from West Chester University. He is now mentoring a junior at Conestoga High School. He has been a Big Brother for the past 45 years. McElvogue also received the Big Brother of the Century Award from Big Brothers Big Sisters.

“The one thing all the boys had in common was that they didn’t have a dad. A lot of people think, which is a misconception, that it is an inner-city issue,” McElvogue said. “All these kids don’t have a male mentor in their life. They don’t have any male to talk to. They are looking for someone to talk to, to give them direction and encouragement. It’s a simple process. It’s not rocket science. It has tremendous results. They become productive members of the community.

“In Delaware County we have over 100 kids who are waiting for Big Brothers. It doesn’t take much, a couple of hours a month. Mentoring means being a part of your life. Going with you to pick up dry cleaning, washing your car, it doesn’t mean that you have to do something fancy. You are not a sugar daddy. It’s a relationship. It’s really simple and it works. Over 250,000 children come through our program and we take all the same precautions with background checks and have a relationship with working with social workers and parents.”

Dan Ruppert of Aldan knows how important it is for boys to have a male mentor in their life. His dad suffered from a stroke. Today he volunteers as a Big Brother. His Little Brother lives in Glenolden.

“I had the luxury of having several surrogate fathers in my life,” Ruppert said. “My father had a stroke when I was very little so I didn’t have the luxury of having a dad to play ball with, but in my neighborhood I had three friends’ dads who really took me in and mentored to me. They took me to ball games and all the good stuff and guided me when I was older.

“The idea that I can have a little bit of impact on somebody is icing on the cake. I feel so rewarded by the opportunity to make a difference in their lives. I can see the impact it has on them. It’s remarkable. It really is. To see than be a little more interested in school or to see things that they didn’t have an opportunity to see, a museum, or some activity or just talking it really is an inspiration.”

“It’s amazing the joy you get with in this whole process,” McElvogue said. “You see the boy develop and the relationship between you and he; Big and the Little. It becomes a real bond. It brings a lot of pride because of what you are doing and the realization that you are doing something very positive.”

There will be two more upcoming recruiting events for Big Brothers in the area: April 21 outside of FOX29 Studios and April 29 at Modell’s at 246 S. 24th Street in Philadelphia. For more information about the Big Brothers Big Sisters program go to www.independencebigs.org.

Check out the full story at Delcotimes.com

Thanks to Anne Neborak, for the story. Contact Anne at aneborak@21st-centurymedia.com, @AnnieNeborak on Twitter

Mentoring is Brotherhood Challenge Dates

Join Rodney McLeod and Pennsylvania State Senator Anthony Williams (D) for 4 Days of the Mentoring is Brotherhood Challenge.

img_2439

Visit www.RM23CHallenge.org for more information!

Philadelphia Style

Brent Celek & Rodney McLeod Reveal One Thing You Might Not Know about Them & Why They Love Philly

By Kristin Detterline | February 16, 2017 | People Feature

With Philly in the sports spotlight for the NFL Draft, Philadelphia Eagles Brent Celek and Rodney McLeod talk football, family, and free time.

Brent Celek and Rodney McLeod.

Rodney McLeod and Brent Celek in action at the Linc.

Run down the stats and Brent Celek and Rodney McLeod don’t seem to have much in common. Celek, who began his career as a fifth-round draft pick under Andy Reid, is a veteran Eagles tight end and has been a fixture on both the football and philanthropy scenes in Philly for more than a decade. McLeod, who grew up around the Washington, DC area, just wrapped up his first season with the Eagles as a safety after starting out as an undrafted free agent with the St. Louis Rams, and is still getting to know his adopted hometown. But they do have one big thing in common: They love the food in Philly, from out-of-the-way pizza joints to stalwart dining experiences like Buddakan. Fresh off a charity fashion show for Big Brothers Big Sisters, Celek and McLeod donned suits instead of uniforms to talk to Philadelphia Style.

When did you both know that football was more than a hobby?
Brent Celek
: I always knew I loved football. I watched all the games growing up, especially Notre Dame. I liked the Eagles but the Pittsburgh Steelers were my favorite team because of Jerome Bettis. He’s my favorite player of all time. I started playing tight end as a freshman in high school. During the first game I caught a touchdown pass, and I knew that was the position I wanted to play.
Rodney McLeod: My mom always made sure we did extracurricular activities, so I played football and basketball, and ran track growing up. I went to the Junior Olympics for track and ran in the Penn Relays in high school. I enjoyed it but I knew football was where I wanted to be. I didn’t want to just run—I wanted to have a purpose behind it. Track has really helped me on the field from a conditioning standpoint. I’ve got a lot of miles on these legs.

What were your first impressions about Philadelphia?
RM
: I’m from the DC area so there are a lot of similarities. I had only been to Philly once before, but I had friends from here so I knew a lot about the city—like the cheesesteaks. I still don’t have a favorite.
BC: Cincinnati was like a ghost town compared to Philadelphia; I had never really been to a major city before. One of the first things that I heard was about the people, that it was a rougher, tougher city. And it turns out that it is. [Laughs] But I liked that. It’s changed me for the better.

How are you spending the off season?
RM
: I’m going to stay in Philly and check out new restaurants. I have a whole list on my phone. I’ve knocked a lot of tourist stuff off my bucket list already: the Rocky steps, Independence Hall, the Liberty Bell.
BC: My family and I are going to a cabin in the Midwest. I like to cook, so I’ll make everything from scratch, and read a lot. Being a new dad is the greatest thing ever. My daughter has really changed how I see the world.

What’s one thing people might not know about you?
RM
: I’m the oldest of five brothers and sisters so I always helped out growing up, from making grilled cheese to changing diapers.
BC: I’m an entrepreneur at heart. Real estate is my passion so I’m getting more involved in that. And I’m working with a local R&B artist, Guordan Banks, on his music career. Music is my other passion.

Scroll to top
X